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Are You Upgrading To Windows 8?

Microsoft’s new operating system is a big improvement over Windows 7, and is evident almost as soon as you turn on your PC.

The boot process is much faster now than previous incarnations of the OS.  We estimate almost 50 percent faster, taking an average of 15 seconds for our computers to boot up.  Gone are the long periods of waiting for Windows to apply computer settings in order to let a user log in.

There are many ways to purchase Windows 8.  It will come installed on many of the newest PC’s and tablets.  Users who own an older version of Windows will also be allowed to upgrade for $39.99.  Microsoft uses an online installer to let users check compatibility with their systems and upgrade.

Users setting up Windows 8 for the first time will be prompted to sign in with a Microsoft account, which acts as a gateway for synchronizing settings for the PC.  It will also provide access to Microsoft apps such as SkyDrive, Xbox Music and the Windows Store.

Every new account created on the PC will trigger a tutorial video designed to teach users how to use the OS.  The video is short and will loop based on the amount of time it takes to configure the account.  Users can navigate their computers by moving their mouse to the corners on of the screen and utilize the newly redesigned Start button.

The Windows 8 desktop now provides access to a new options, such as file history, storage spaces, and restore or reset options.  File history allows users to quickly restore folders or files from a backup.  Storage spaces lets users group together physical disks into a larger storage pool, and the restore and reset options allow users to refresh a PC while keeping documents, accounts, personal settings, and Windows Store apps.

One great new feature of this OS is the improved multiple monitor support.  Previous Windows versions left the feature up to a graphics card to provide the additional functionality with drivers.  Basic features, such as the ability to have different desktop backgrounds on each monitor are now supported.  Users can now span a single picture across multiple monitors.

Taskbar options are greatly improved, with the ability to display the taskbar on all displays and options to show buttons on all taskbars or individual ones where the window is open and the main taskbar resides.

While this OS is gear more for tablets, the traditional keyboard shortcuts still work, so power users can run Windows 8 on a desktop in a similar manner to Windows 7.  Microsoft also added a power user menu to the Start screen to help desktop users.

While Vroooom Web is still learning about the new Windows OS, we can say for sure it’s a big step up from Microsoft’s last iteration.